Desperate Shortages?

Every time corporations want to increase the quotas on guestworkers they repeat the same tired old lies about a supposed “desperate shortage” of workers in some field or other. Actually under capitalism there can never (by definition) be a labor shortage in any field. Any temporary shortage is quickly followed by a rise in wages and benefits until the shortage is alleviated. No wage increase, no shortage.

So should you send your kid to college to study science and math and engineering to alleviate the “desperate shortage” showed by current lowering enrollments in those fields? Hmm:

…the fact is that university enrollment in science programs has historically risen and fallen in almost perfect correlation to the opportunities in the job market.

…the U.S.-born scientist as a practical matter really only has access to the scientific job market in the United States, whereas his or her European counterpart has access to opportunities in the United States and the European Union.

…if there were indeed an undersupply of scientists, you?d see hyperinflation of salaries, which of course is simply not the case in any field of science. For example, a graduating Ph.D. in physics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California currently receives a starting postdoctoral salary between $39,312 and $55,788. The other national laboratories and the National Institutes of Health offer similar salaries. According to the laws of labor economics, if there is no hyperinflation of salaries, then there can be no labor shortage. However, I do think that there is a shortage of U.S. citizens who are willing to spend 10 or more years to get a Ph.D. in physics for a starting salary of $39,312 a year.

…we were able to identify only 11 African American Ph.D.-level physicists with career positions in the major DOE-funded national laboratories. This was out of a total of 3200 Ph.D.-level physicists employed by the laboratories. Out of the top 20 physics departments, there are only two African Americans in tenure-track faculty positions. What we conclude from this analysis is that foreign nationals are preferred over African Americans in hiring at these facilities.

…the income of a foreign national with a J-1 visa, typically used for postdoctoral appointments, is not subject to U.S. income taxes. This puts the foreign national at a 15% salary advantage compared to the U.S. citizen in the same postdoctoral position.

My daughter went to a high school whose purpose was to persuade kids to major in science, math, and engineering. I’m glad she resisted the temptation. She’s better off.

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