Amnesty? Or Open Season on Blacks?

The big push is on. In both the House and Senate the Cheap Labor Lobby is pushing to open the floodgates on bringing in folks to take jobs from American workers. The SKIL Bill (the SHILL Bill) in the Senate and the Strive Act Ithe Starve Act) in the house will allow huge numbers of guestworkers in to take any job that requires a college degree, and allow amnesty (without ever using the name) for unlimited numbers of illegals to take any job that does not.

If people want to give up their own middle class jobs (or the future jobs of their children or grandchildren) to guestworkers, that is their choice.

But right now I’d like to know where are the jobs coming from that are taken by the one to three million illegal immigrants coming in every year, many of them without technical job skills or good communications skills. Are there that many new jobs being created in this country for them?

Well, no. They are most certainly NOT taking jobs that Americans won’t do. They are taking jobs that Americans were doing, Americans who were already poor or barely making it, until they got replaced.

And it turns out that many of them were Black.

Finally, studies are starting to appear to show the effects of government policies to stop enforcing laws against illegal immigration:

The employment rate of black men, and particularly of low-skill black men, fell precipitously from 1960 to 2000. At the same time, the incarceration rate of black men rose markedly. This paper examines the relation between immigration and these trends in black employment and incarceration. Using data drawn from the 1960-2000 U.S. Censuses, we find a strong correlation between immigration, black wages, black employment rates, and black incarceration rates. As immigrants disproportionately increased the supply of workers in a particular skill group, the wage of black workers in that group fell, the employment rate declined, and the incarceration rate rose. Our analysis suggests that a 10-percent immigrant-induced increase in the supply of a particular skill group reduced the black wage by 3.6 percent, lowered the employment rate of black men by 2.4 percentage points, and increased the incarceration rate of blacks by almost a full percentage point.

Unfortunately, the study is behind a for pay firewall, and only excerpts can be found. More data from it:

Between 1960 and 2000, the employment rate for black men plunged from 90 percent to 76 percent; for “low-skilled” black men (defined as high-school dropouts), in particular, it fell from 89 percent to just 56 percent. Between 1980 and 2000, meanwhile, the incarceration rate for black men rose from just 1 percent to nearly 10 percent. A new study considers this shift in light of large-scale immigration, which may have crowded black men out of the labor market and made a shift to crime more appealing. The researchers found that as immigration increased the supply of workers at a particular education level, the employment rate for black men in that category declined, and the incarceration rate rose. From 1980 to 2000, the authors conclude, immigration accounted for roughly a third of the decline in the black employment rate, and about 10 percent of the increase in the incarceration rate for low-skilled African Americans.

George J. Borjas, one of the authors of the above study, also authored the book Heaven’s Door: Immigration Policy and the American Economy, with similar findings:

…the benefits of immigration have been greatly exaggerated and that if the American people allow immigration to continue unabated and unmodified, they are supporting an astonishing transfer of wealth from the poorest people in the country, who are disproportionately minorities, to the richest.

Despite estimates that range into hundreds of billions of dollars, net annual gains from immigration are only about $8 billion.

In dragging down wages, immigration currently shifts tens of billions of dollars per year from workers to employers and users of immigrants’ services.

And:

The new immigrants, Borjas finds, have also increased inequality in this country by depressing the economic opportunities of native-born unskilled workers. They have placed substantial fiscal burdens on the welfare systems of the states in which they congregate, and they have benefited employers of unskilled workers. In sum, today’s immigration “can be viewed as an income-redistribution program, a large wealth transfer” favoring high- over low-income Americans.

Many of these findings are now uncontested. The National Academy of Sciences Research Council (NRC) estimates that immigration was responsible for 44 percent of the decline in real wages experienced by high-school dropouts between 1980 and 1994. Writing in the Public Interest (Fall 1998), Steven Camarota, a scholar at the Center for Immigration Studies, maintained that the wage effects are even “larger than those reported in the NRC study.”

…multiculturalist banalities, it should be noted, happen to coincide neatly with the interests of the principal beneficiaries of today’s immigration–the people who hire the pool cleaners and gardeners in Beverly Hills and East Hampton and who insist on having freshly hand-picked vegetables and salads on their dinner table.

Illegal immigration has been used as a policy by cheap labor advocates to transfer hard-gotten gains over many decades from the poor, many of them Black, to the richest. And the gullible among us have gone along with it, with former Liberal (now Neo-Liberal corporatist) Senator Kennedy leading the charge to help George Bush and the wealthy racists take money from Blacks and give it to themselves (with tiny tidbits to the illegals themselves) by trying (successfully or not) to force Blacks and Hispanics to compete against each other for the limited pool of jobs. And there will be gullible Liberals and Progressives there to help. And perhaps save a few bucks by exchanging their own Black nanny or gardener for a Brown one.

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One Response to Amnesty? Or Open Season on Blacks?

  1. Immigration reform goals for the CBC

    The members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) recognize the need for a comprehensive approach to immigration reform that includes increased security, protection against illegal immigration, immigration policies that have articulated objectives and fair administration of our immigration system. Consistent with this, the CBC adopts the following Statement of Principles.

    DIVERSITY AND EQUAL TREATMENT
    The CBC supports immigration criteria that will increase the diversity of immigration from countries that have historically been underrepresented, such as countries in the Caribbean and Africa, or treated unequally, such as Haiti.

    EARNED ACCESS TO CITIZENSHIP
    The CBC supports earned access to lawful permanent resident status for persons currently in the United States that takes the following factors into account:

    Unification of immigrant families, which would include uniting immigrants with spouses, children or other close family members who are citizens or lawful permanent residents of the United States;
    Proven employment records through temporary and guest worker programs or other temporary residence programs; and
    Such reform of earned access to citizenship should also include a path to permanency for the undocumented already here.
    ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY AND FAIR WAGES FOR LEGAL WORKERS
    The CBC believes that all citizens and legal workers in the United States should be assured education and job training, non-discriminatory employment opportunity and livable wage. The CBC, therefore, supports increased funding for education and job training utilizing fees generated from new immigration provisions and other resources and supports increased funding for enforcement of laws against employment discrimination, wage and hour violations, unfair labor practices and illegal hiring. The CBC also supports holding employers accountable for the legal status of their employees.

    BORDER SECURITY
    The CBC believes that the federal government has the responsibility to protect, through border security and other means, against immigrants illegally entering the country and/or overstaying their authorized periods of admission. The CBC, therefore, supports funding for border security equipment, border patrol agents, enforcement and other resources as reasonably necessary to accomplish those objectives.

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